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San Francisco Public Press

April 10 2020

Want to Foster a Dog? Get on the Waitlist as Demand Soars at Bay Area Shelters

Since the COVID-19 shelter-in-place orders went into effect in March, Bay Area animal shelters have received an overwhelming response from residents offering to foster cats and dogs during the crisis.

Deploying rapid emails and social media posts to get out the word, every animal shelter contacted was able to move nearly all animals into foster homes within days of the quarantine, except for animals that needed to remain at the shelters for health or behavioral reasons. …

“Volunteers stepped up immediately because they always do. They’re amazing,” said Deb Campbell, Volunteer and Outreach Coordinator for San Francisco Animal Care & Control. “We were just overwhelmed with the amount of requests from the public. It was really heartening.”

Volunteers have provided most of the support for foster animals. Representatives of all contacted shelters said that at least half of their animals were placed with previous foster parents. Many shelters were able to place all animals with trained volunteers. …

By relieving stress and isolation, pets can provide a huge boost, according to Sherri Franklin, founder of the senior dog rescue shelter, Muttville, in San Francisco. “It’s a scientific fact that dogs lower your blood pressure, keep you happy and get you outside to exercise a little bit more. It’s an absolute cure for loneliness. You can save a life while you’re sitting at home.”

While all shelters contacted are at capacity for foster parents, many have resumed adoptions and are looking to transition foster dogs to permanent homes. …

KTVU Fox2 (2020)

April 9 2020

Muttville Senior Dog Rescue and Family Dog Rescue in #SF see spike in dog adoptions.

From her backyard, Sherri Franklin, founder of Muttville, a senior dog rescue group in San Francisco, is using her phone to show Ziggy, an 8-year-old Chihuahua, to a person who’s interested in adopting a dog.

All meet-and-greets are done via FaceTime or Zoom, since Muttville’s offices are closed to comply with the shelter-in-place order.

Franklin says applications from people who want to foster or adopt a dog have flooded the nonprofit.

There are normally 20 to 25 applications a week. That number jumped to 120 the first week of the stay- at-home order.

“I’ve been involved with animal rescues for 25 years. I have never seen anything like this,” said Franklin.

- Amber Lee

KTVU Fox2 (2020)

April 8 2020

Spike in pet adoptions at San Francisco shelters because of coronavirus

Animal rescue groups across the country report that they are seeing a spike in pet adoptions. Experts say dogs offer people comfort and they help quell anxiety during these stressful times.

With people working, studying and generally sheltered at home, many say it’s the perfect time to get a companion.

KTVU visited two dog rescue groups in San Francisco to see how things have changed.

From her backyard, Sherri Franklin, founder of Muttville, a senior dog rescue group in San Francisco, is using her phone to show Ziggy, an 8-year-old Chihuahua, to a person who’s interested in adopting a dog.

All meet and greets are done via FaceTime or Zoom since Muttville’s offices are closed to comply with the shelter-in-place order.

Franklin said applications from people who want to foster or adopt a dog have flooded the nonprofit.

There are normally 20 to 25 applications a week. That number jumped to 120 the first week of the stay- at-home order.

“I’ve been involved with animal rescues for 25 years. I have never seen anything like this,” said Franklin. …

Forces For Nature

April 7 2020

Giving Senior Dogs a Second Chance

Crystal DiMiceli interviews Sherri Franklin, Muttville’s founder and CEO

Vegan Women Summit

April 3 2020

Five Vegan Women Making a Difference During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Sherri Franklin – Emptying cages and saving lives

When Sherri Franklin, founder of beloved Muttville Senior Dog Rescue and CNN Hero, learned about shelter closures on the horizon, she sprung to action emptying cages and finding foster homes all across Northern California. Utilizing a new virtual adoption approach, Sherri has rehomed hundreds of lucky dogs. And, thanks to the tireless efforts of Sherri and other incredible rescue leaders, San Francisco is now one of several cities across the US facing a unique new problem: a shortage of dogs available for foster.

Today Show on Instagram

March 30 2020

Shelter dogs are finding new homes during coronavirus pandemic

While working from home and sheltering in place, families across the country are adopting dogs from shelters like Muttville Senior Dog Rescue. …

BarkSpot

March 30 2020

150-Pound Senior Rescue Dog Gets The Second Chance He Deserves

Muttville Senior Dog Rescue in San Francisco, CA takes in over one thousand senior dogs every year. They do everything they can for each of those individual lives, and one of those special dogs is Watson.

Surrendered to the shelter after his owner passed away, this English Mastiff found himself in a difficult situation. Thanks to his friends at Muttville, however, he’s on his way to a great life.

Muttville isn’t exactly your average animal shelter.

When you visit the Muttville facility, you won’t find dogs cooped up in kennels. You also won’t find playful puppies attracting all the attention. What you will find, however, is a safe haven for rescued senior dogs.

Dogs that would have a hard time getting adopted in a traditional shelter find hope and second chances at Muttville. Older dogs live in a cage-free environment, often with a loving foster, and wait for the perfect families to take them home.

When Muttville rescuers found Watson, they knew his road ahead wouldn’t be easy. At 10 years old and 150 pounds, he’s not like every other dog in the shelter. …

San Francisco Examiner (2017)

March 29 2020

In a time of isolation, the demand for animal companions has increased

Flooded with requests to foster or adopt, shelters and rescue groups move operations online

Andrew Stillman first met Bacio, a 10-year-old terrier mix, online through a video call.

“It was surreal and a bit of a risk because I made that decision to adopt him before actually meeting, but at the same time you can get a good sense of their personality,” said Stillman, whose adoption of Bacio went through on Thursday after several video calls with the dog’s foster family. “Right now is a unique time. I live alone, and so in some ways it was the perfect time to have someone to shelter in place with me and to build a relationship with.”

Stillman said while working from home and on calls, Bacio likes to lounge lazily on the couch next to him.

“We’re all going through this incredible moment of change collectively in this pandemic, and a dog can be a great partner in that,” Stillman said.

During these days of isolation, animal shelters and rescues have received a flood of requests to potentially foster or adopt animals in need of homes. After Gov. Gavin Newsom ordered a statewide shelter-at-home and told non-essential businesses to shut down, animal shelters and rescues quickly tried to find foster homes for the animals left in their shelters. The community sprang into action. …

“So many people who have reached out to us are suffering from isolation and loneliness,” said Sherri Franklin, the founder of Muttville. “An animal can turn that around in a split second. They need affection, can give affection, get you outside for a walk and help everyday with a little exercise.”

Although Newsom clarified that animal care workers are classified as essential service workers, many of the shelters have closed until further notice to protect staff and potential foster parents and adopters. Rescues like Muttville, which connected Stillman to his little terrier Bacio, have started virtual adoptions, meetings over video conference for potential adopters with dogs, and no-contact drop-offs.

“Everybody is adapting to this new way to do business and it’s been kind of fun,” said Franklin from Muttville. …

Borneo Bulletin

March 29 2020

Alone no more: People are turning to dogs, cats and chickens to cope with self-isolation

[Yes, Borneo. The Borneo Bulletin picked up the March 20th story from The Washington Post (see below). It’s our first mention in Borneo, as far as we know!]

NBC Today.com

March 28 2020

Shelter dogs are finding new homes during coronavirus pandemic

While working from home and sheltering in place due to the coronavirus pandemic, families across the country are adopting dogs from shelters, like Muttville Senior Dog Rescue.

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