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8013,8014,8020,8016,8010,8017,8001,8002,8004,7742,7987,7990,8000,7986,7995,7989,7992,7970,7698,7978,7972,6994,7981,7903,7965,7899,7973,7975,7783,7945,7907,7959,7844,7894,7923,7922,7902,7901,7694,7885,7871,7865,7864,7731,7548,7772,7802,7756,7752
Montana 7481
Montana 7481
Montana 7481
Hail Mary 7482
Hail Mary 7482
Hail Mary 7482
Tackle 7488
Tackle 7488
Tackle 7488
Niblet 7484
Niblet 7484
Niblet 7484
Haley 7478
Haley 7478
Haley 7478
Pico 7485
Pico 7485
Pico 7485
Nessie 7473
Nessie 7473
Nessie 7473
Tango 7474
Tango 7474
Tango 7474
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Success stories

Charlie (aka Radar)

Charlie (aka Radar)

Why Foster?

Most people know how fostering benefits animals and adopters. When dogs go to foster homes, it frees up space in shelters for other needy animals and helps the foster dogs get used to a home situation and work on negative behavior. Adopters benefit because the foster can provide information to help judge if the animal is a good fit for their family. So what does the foster parent get out of it? Answer: A lot!

Having a pet, particularly a dog, is good for a family because it teaches children responsibility and compassion. It is good for adults, particularly seniors, because pets provide company and keep their guardians active and involved. But there are many reasons why adopting a pet might not be possible at certain times. Maybe your living situation is uncertain and you might have to relocate some time in the near future because of employment or housing issues. Maybe you travel a lot, for business or pleasure, and think it not fair to board a pet often or for long periods. Maybe you can’t afford expensive vet bills (always possible). Or maybe you just aren’t sure if having a dog is right for you.

Last spring, I was retired and living alone when my last dog (a Muttville mutt) crossed the rainbow bridge. In one way, it was a new-found freedom and a bit of a relief. I saved a lot of money on vet bills; I was able to take a vacation without worrying about who would take care of my dog (with no family in the area, this becomes hard and expensive as a dog gets older and has medical issues); and when my family visited from out of town, we could spend a whole day out in San Francisco or Santa Cruz without worrying about getting home to feed the dog. I decided that I would not get another dog – at least for a while.

However, I found that I really, really missed the company of a dog. So I decided that fostering – for Muttville of course – would be a good compromise; I could have the companionship of a dog and help get it ready for its forever home, but not be tied down as a permanent dog guardian. I have fostered five different dogs and really enjoyed it. I had a loving animal to keep me company while I took care of it. But if I was traveling or had another conflict, I could leave the dog at Muttville. Meanwhile I was back to taking walks in the neighborhood and reconnecting with neighbors on the other end of the block (I am somehow incapable of walking around the block without a dog to lead me) and I got to know some wonderful Muttville dogs.

People ask if it is hard to give up a foster dog. I have had my fosters for as few as 3 days and as long as 3 months, and some good-byes are harder than others. But in every case, I have either met the forever parent or connected via email or phone, and felt very good about the family my foster was joining. The new parents have all sent photos of the dog in his new home with his new animal siblings, which is very heart warming. It also feels good knowing that I have helped my fosters find homes by increasing their exposure to different people, testing their tolerance for cats (with the help of a cat-parent neighbor), or working on problem issues. One foster had a habit of peeing in the house – mine and others – that we worked hard to overcome.

Are you the proud parent of Muttville dog? Send us your story! Include three of your favorite photos and send it to success_stories@muttville.org with the subject line 'Success Story'.

Cody (aka Whistler)

Cody (aka Whistler)

I adopted Cody (aka Whistler) in September, 2017, and just wanted to thank you for helping to bring such joy and love into my life. I can’t imagine my life without him in it. He is such a silly, loving, gentle soul. Much to my surprise, he is also a herder! I have donkeys, both miniature and mammoth sizes, and whenever I bring them out, he circles them just like my past border collies did. He takes his job seriously, making sure everybody stays together. Everyone who met him back in the beginning comments on how much happier and healthier he looks and acts. I love my “little boy” so much and he loves me right back.

Thanks again,

Lori & Cody

Are you the proud parent of Muttville dog? Send us your story! Include three of your favorite photos and send it to success_stories@muttville.org with the subject line 'Success Story'.

Jo Jo (aka Pho)

Jo Jo (aka Pho)

Jo Jo (aka Pho) was adopted by us on December 21, 2017. He has become a loving member of our household.

He likes his walks as long as both my wife and I go together, if not his brakes go on and he stops. When he is home, he can be found napping on the sofa or dancing around to remind us of his meal times.

Are you the proud parent of Muttville dog? Send us your story! Include three of your favorite photos and send it to success_stories@muttville.org with the subject line 'Success Story'.

Andy (In Memoriam)

Andy (In Memoriam)

Andy came into my life in July of 2015. He was my first dog, and I was terrified about having a living creature completely dependent on me. I remember that first night, both of us looking at each other like “now what??”

He didn’t do all the stereotypical things I assumed all dogs did. He had arthritis so couldn’t sit, he was hard of hearing so couldn’t recall or do tricks, and had cataracts so didn’t catch the ball.

But he enjoyed leisurely walks, and pats on the head. He was gentle, patient and aloof, and tolerated me in so many ways. He brightened up the workplace, as he wandered around the office looking for treats and head rubs.

Andy crossed the rainbow bridge this past June, peacefully at home. The three years he was with us were filled with lots of life and love. He is sorely missed.

Are you the proud parent of Muttville dog? Send us your story! Include three of your favorite photos and send it to success_stories@muttville.org with the subject line 'Success Story'.

Estelle

Estelle

It’s been almost a year since I’ve fostered, then adopted Estelle the 11 yr old shih tzu and it’s hard for me to imagine life before her. She is truly my best friend. Estelle is a total velcro dog and follows me around everywhere. If she even suspects I will leave the room she is ready to follow right behind me; she’s the perfect companion. Estelle is the sweetest, most laid-back dog I’ve ever had. She’ll let anyone come up to her and give her love and really enjoys meeting new people and exploring new places. As I’m writing this, she’s taking a nap (one of many daily) right beside me and I can hear her little doggie snores :) I’m really so grateful to be able to give her a comfortable home that she deserves. I love her so much, and I’d do anything for her. Thank you Muttville for changing her life and in doing so, changing mine.

Are you the proud parent of Muttville dog? Send us your story! Include three of your favorite photos and send it to success_stories@muttville.org with the subject line 'Success Story'.

Tucker (in memoriam)

I met Tucker on September 17, 2011 at a Muttville adoption fair in Mill Valley, CA. I wasn't seriously looking to adopt yet. I wanted to "just take a look" at the kind of dogs Muttville rescued and learn what I would need to do to live with a dog.

When I arrived, Tucker's foster mom greeted me. I told her I was thinking of adopting my first "maybe medium-sized" dog (which in my head was 40‑45 lb, a size I thought I could independently lift into my car if I ever had a sick dog that needed to goto the vet). She pointed to Tucker and said "he's medium sized." I didn't have the heart to tell her that, well, no, he's a pretty large dog. (I later found out he was "medium" to her because she lived with two 120‑130 lb Rhodesian ridgebacks). To be polite, I sat down on the ground to chat with her and meet Tucker.

Immediately Tucky put his head on my lap and I started to cave – maybe I could be ready to adopt a dog now?The following weekend, I took him for a trial weekend from his foster family. Antonia, Ari, and Anja drove to SF to meet us. We went to Golden Gate Park. Tucker put his head on my lap again. I adopted him from Muttville the following weekend, October 1, 2011.

Tucker had multiple nicknames over the course of his seven years with me. Some were my names of affection for him. Some were given by friends and family:

Tucker. Tucky. Tuckster. Tucky-two-times. (Ken)Tucky. Tuck-meister. Mr T. Tolerant Tucker. Tucky-bucky. Big man. Big boy. Turkey.

Tolerant Tucker came about because of how wonderful he was around kids.

I always thought he was the most handsome mutt (see his model shot). Even in his final days – and when he was put to sleep – he looked handsome, carrying such grace.

He had a funny penchant for meditating by sticking his head in plants. And, like so many dogs, he embodied unconditional love. Adopting him was the best thing I did at that time in my life. Feeling his love helped me realize that my life at that time wasn't going the way I wanted and I needed to make changes.

Tucker has been with me for major events in my life. (Above: ringdog at Gabe's and my mawwage; Vienna's arrival; Mateo's arrival. Right: Pretty's adoption)

Tucker has always shared the same predilection for sleep as my other main man, Gabriel.

Above left: Snuggled into my sleeping bag next to Gabe during a camping trip (he took over my sleepsack as soon as I stepped out for a nighttime potty break).

Above right: Snuggled one last time with Gabe and Mateo two nights ago. For the past week Gabe, Mateo and I have been camped out, sleeping on mats in our sleeping bags next to Tucker.

Tucker's final resting place, in the back yard looking west to the sunset and up the hill to our home. Thank you for seven beautiful years of unconditional love. We love you right back. (September 7, 2018)

Are you the proud parent of Muttville dog? Send us your story! Include three of your favorite photos and send it to success_stories@muttville.org with the subject line 'Success Story'.

Becki (in Memoriam)

Becki (in Memoriam)

I want to let you know that we helped our sweet Becki to the Rainbow Bridge this past June where she now waits for us with her Muttville sister Gertie. Becki had two awesome years free of cancer. Becki’s final months were spent doing all the things she loved…being held, snuggling with her fur sibs, car rides, walks, and eating her favorite things.

Becki brought immense joy to our family, and we will miss her every day. We are forever grateful to Muttville for trusting Becki’s forever to us. We are blessed to have been loved by such an awesome dog!

Are you the proud parent of Muttville dog? Send us your story! Include three of your favorite photos and send it to success_stories@muttville.org with the subject line 'Success Story'.

Cosmo (in Memoriam)

Cosmo (in Memoriam)

I adopted sweet hospice gal Cosmo. She was barely available when I snagged that sweet girl to foster, and when she was ruled as hospice, I couldn’t help but to keep that sweet baby, and keep her comfortable and happy for her last few months. She was with us for a total of 9 months. When she first got to Muttville and at her first vet visit with us, they didn’t give her more than a couple weeks to live.

Cosmo was such a special lady. At the time I adopted her, I was going through a very rough time due to mental health issues and there is no other way to put it but to say Cosmo saved my life. She exterminated all those sick suicidal thoughts in my head, and if it wasn’t for her getting into my life, I probably wouldn’t be here now. She taught me even when I thought I was worthless, someone or something out there could use my help and my love.

When she passed in April, I had just come out of the hospital, where they were finally able to give me the right diagnoses. She pretty much picked the pup we adopted then, and when I was finally more stable and on the right track, my sweet baby left me. It has been almost five months and there has not been one day since that I don’t think about her.

Cosmo was my sweet angel. When I thought I was saving her life, she was actually saving mine.

I try and look for every single way there is to cherish my baby girl, and so I thought of asking if you could possibly post her little memorial with the other ones on the website. Cos has such a sad story (or so we think) before she got to Muttville, and seeing her flourish and bubble up (bubbles was her nickname) to become my best friend was the most rewarding thing that has ever happened in my life.

Camila

Are you the proud parent of Muttville dog? Send us your story! Include three of your favorite photos and send it to success_stories@muttville.org with the subject line 'Success Story'.

Red

Red

A quick note to let you all know that our gorgeous RED is the greatest gift to my family. We adopted this blind mini­pin the Sunday after Thanksgiving and it has been nothing but a pleasure to watch her map her yard, the house, adapt to car rides in the crate (and go on 2 road trips!) and facilitate her sun bathing, which is surely her favorite activity. She is the sweetest soul and the EASIEST dog I have ever had the pleasure of sharing space with. We love Red and we love Muttville!

xoxoxo

Amy

Are you the proud parent of Muttville dog? Send us your story! Include three of your favorite photos and send it to success_stories@muttville.org with the subject line 'Success Story'.

Marni, Trinket & Juliette (aka Pom Pom)

Marni, Trinket & Juliette (aka Pom Pom)

We’re the proud family of not one, but three Muttville Alums.

It all started with our Marni. At the wise and seasoned age of ten our sweet Great Dane, Emma Lou, passed away leaving behind our sweet shih tzu poodle mix, Mopps.

Mopps was eight, and definitely didn’t have patience for a puppy no matter how lonely she was without her sister. Aside from that, as Emma had gotten older my husband and I found ourselves appalled at the amount of people who were shocked that we would care for her “old lady” ailments when we could just put her to sleep and get a new dog.

A close friend introduced me to Muttville, and I’ve never looked back. Marni was the perfect match for Mopps, and dispelled any myth that our five year old wouldn’t bond with a dog unless it was a puppy.

Life with Marni has been pure bliss. So much so, that my husband and I decided to open our home to two additional Mutts. Trinket joined us after the 2017 Senior Prom, and Juliette (aka Pom Pom) in late March 2018.

We call this little old lady gang The Golden Girls, and to say they’re our everything would be a gross understatement.

These girls have filled our home with love and humor while teaching us the beauty of slowing down and appreciating all the good that life has to offer.

Thank you, Muttville! These sweet girls would not be in our lives without the amazing work you do.

Love, Jaclyn

Are you the proud parent of Muttville dog? Send us your story! Include three of your favorite photos and send it to success_stories@muttville.org with the subject line 'Success Story'.

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